Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.493538
Title: September 11th in the Greek and British media: A discourse analysis of newspaper representations
Author: Sirmoglou, Anna
ISNI:       0000 0001 3416 2735
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
The September 11 events received extensive coverage in the British and Greek media. This thesis employs a post-positivist, discursive analytic framework drawing largely from Laclau and Mouffe, Foucault and Derrida to explore the press representations of major Greek and British newspapers six months before September 11 and during the ensuing Afghanistan and Iraq wars. Specifically, the analysis focuses on these two culturally distinct, European countries' constructions of the events, the role of the U. S. in the international system, their role as E. U. members, as well as their perception of emerging threats. Some of the key representations analyzed are the Kyoto protocol, globalization and the anti-globalization movement, terrorism, Islam and Saddam Hussein. The thesis explores the way events are understood and represented in different cultural contexts. One of the primary aims of the project is to discover the differences and similarities in the representations of the two countries,a s well as whether and in what respects events such as those of September 11, the war in Afghanistan and the subsequent Iraq war can affect existing articulations and existing state identity constructions. Finally, drawing from the belief that discursive practices are political practices, the thesis studies the ways in which these discourses may have enabled, necessitated or disabled particular responses and courses of action and the ways in which they may have marginalized other discourses
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.493538  DOI: Not available
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