Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.492331
Title: An adaptive architecture to support web graphics exploration for visually impaired people
Author: Tan, C. C.
Awarding Body: Queens University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
This thesis employs a user-centered approach to design and develop an extensible, adaptive system, the ACTIVE system to improve Web graphics accessibility for visually impaired people. It is capable of adapting to its context of use such as graphics type, asssistive technologies and user profiles in order to choose a suitable graphical multimodal application for the user. Additionally, the system consists of a user model which contains information about a user in terms of their background, experience levels, and preferences. By performing a series of experiments with visually impaired people, it reveals that people with similar profiles and experience levels prefer certain exploration conditions. Consequently, a list of adaptation rules have been derived and applied in the system. By using a feature-based approach, the ACTIVE system learns about the users from their previous interaction with applications and presents to them with their most preferable and appropriate interface. The ACTIVE system was designed in accordance with usability and accessibility guidelines. The system was evaluated with visually impaired people and the results reveal that it has improved the overall experience and satisfaction of people with sight loss when accessing graphics non-visually. Furthermore, the adaptation accuracy level of the ACTIVE system increases with the degree of system use, where 96.67% of accuracy was achieved in the experiments. This thesis shows the possibilities in developing a coherent, adaptive system by integrating various variables such as graphics types, assistive technologies and multimodalities. It also demonstrates that adaptation can bring benefits to people with visual impairments in enhancing their graphics accessibility.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Queens University Belfast, 2008 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.492331  DOI: Not available
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