Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.492170
Title: Nonverbal communication in the primary classroom.
Author: White, J.
Awarding Body: Queens University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2009
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Abstract:
This research sought to explore two questions: 1. Are teachers aware oftheir classroom nonverbal communication? 2. In what ways and contexts is nonverbal communication relevant to the work of teachers? The research asked each ofthree primary school teachers to examine and reflect on their nonverbal communication in a fonnative and progressive manner using three samples of video footage of their teaching. These video recordings were examined to assess how nonverbal communication manifested itself. A 'self-evaluation framework' for classroom nonverbal communication was derived from a review of the literature. The specific . nonverbal areas selected for the framework were: eye contact, gesture, facial expression, body language, use of space, physical arrangement of classroom, vocal intonation, backchannel responses and smiling. The research found that the teachers identified a host of ways and contexts in which nonverbal communication was relevant and important to their work. The findings indicate that teacher awareness of such communication was very limited and highlighted the importance of nonverbal communication to the pedagogical processes ofthe primary classroom. These important dimensions included the differentiated use of nonverbal communication with respect to class level, pupil ability, pupil behaviour and the subject being taught. It involved the use ofnonverbal communication as a pedagogical tool to aid the delivery and explanation of lesson content. Such use was also interconnected with the motivational use of nonverbal communication and the expression of emotion in the classroom. Finally, the data indicates that teaching experience, self-perceptions as a teacher and the influence of significant others have an important impact on the style and nature of the teacher's nonverbal communication.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Queens University Belfast, 2009 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.492170  DOI: Not available
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