Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.491443
Title: Spatial distribution as a tool in the assessment of animal welfare
Author: Febrer, Kian
ISNI:       0000 0001 3458 6570
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
Statistical analysis of spatial distribution has often been used in some fields of biology, such as ecology and epidemiology, but is less often used in studies of animal behaviour and welfare. This thesis introduces a novel statistic, the CV residual, for analysing the spatial distribution of animals in an area of known size and shape, and considers its properties under various possible models of the social behaviour of animals, such as attraction and aversion from nearby animals. The CV residual is applied to data on the spatial distribution of farm animals kept in enclosed spaces, often at high stocking densities, for which concern has been raised over the animals' welfare. Analyses include the spatial distributions of broiler chickens raised in commercial houses at different, experimentally manipulated, stocking densities, the spatial distributions of young chicks raised in a brooder house at different temperatures and relative humidities, and the spatial distributions of sheep being transported in lorry pens as the lorries drive over highways and urban roads. The results show that stocking density has little or no effect on the social behaviour of broiler chickens, and that temperature and relative humidity have little effect on the behaviour of young chicks, but sheep do space themselves differently when travelling pver highways and urban roads. The CV residual can also be applied to spatial distributions arising from computer simulations of mathematical models of animal behaviour. This thesis develops a model of the behaviour and spatial position of chickens, based on observations of real chickens, and uses the CV residual to compare the spatial distributions arising from the simulations with the spatial distributions of real chickens.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Oxford, 2006 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.491443  DOI: Not available
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