Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.491128
Title: Aspects of Dynamic Heterogeneity in Models of Supercooled Liquids
Author: Hedges, Lester Owen
ISNI:       0000 0001 3551 9919
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Nottingham
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
In this thesis we study dynamic heterogeneity in glass-forming systems by means of kinetically constrained models (KC1\Is) and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. KCr-Is are idealised models of supercooled liquids in which glassy dynamics are the result of local dynamical constraints. By studying a range of models with varying complexity we show that KC1\Is readily capture the key dynamical ingredients of supercooled liquids. Using the framework of r-Ionte Carlo with absorbing r-Iarkov Chains (r.ICAr-IC) we develop an advanced algorithm that can improve on traditional numerical methods by many orders of magnitude for the simulation of a particular KC1\1. \Ve use the two-vacancy assisted triangular lattice gas, or (2)-TLG, to investigate the relationship between structure and dynamics in a supercooled liquid. KCr-Is are used to help interpret recent atomistic simulations that consider supercooled dynamics in terms of transitions between low-energy configurations, or 'metabasins', of the potential energy landscape. Our results imply that dynamic facilitation may be a suitable mechanism for such transitions. We analyse distributions of persistence and exchange times in a computationally efficient atomistic model. For sufficient supercooling we observe a striking de-coupling behveen the two distributions, as previously predicted from KCr.Is. Finally, ,ve study the dynamics of KCr-Is under the influence of an external field, both in the form of confinement and a gravitational field. \Ve compare our results to recent experimental and numerical studies.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Nottingham, 2007 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.491128  DOI: Not available
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