Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.490635
Title: Career, Catholicism and Culture: an exploration of the career experiences of women managers in Catholic Sixth Form Colleges
Author: Nevin, Janet
Awarding Body: University of Liverpool
Current Institution: University of Liverpool
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
This research aims to explore the extent to which the culture of Catholic sixth form colleges impacts on the progression opportunities of women teachers and how the structures and values in the Catholic Church impact upon those institutions for which it is responsible. It Will explore the tension between the Catholic Church's tenet of valuing every one as an individual and the privileging of male roles within the strict hierarchical structure of the Church. Related to this will be the exploration of barriers to women's career progression and whether there are any which are peculiar to working in a Catholic sixth form college as opposed to a non-denominational institution. It aims to examine women's experience of work and career in Catholic sixth form colleges. It will explore the reasons for the under - representation of women in management positions; the career paths which women have taken; what has motivated and supported them in their careers and what has not. The research is underpinned by a practical motivation and will outline what the findings suggest about the way forward. It will explore whether there is anything that women managers of the future can learn from the experience of women currently in management roles in Catholic Sixth Form Colleges. It will explore the expectations of new women teachers about their careers and whether the Catholic colleges led by women (only 2 out of 16) provide a different experience of careers for the women who work in them.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Liverpool, 2008 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.490635  DOI: Not available
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