Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.490405
Title: Multinational Chinese Family Businesses: Evidence from Taiwan
Author: Hsu, Yu-hsu
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The model of the Chinese family business (CFB) and its institutional origins was initially developed by examining the development of these firms in their domestic context (e.g. Whitley, 1999, 1994a; Hamilton, 1997 and Redding, 1993). These authors proposed limits to the growth of CFBs based on their specific characteristics as firstly, family-owned and managed, secondly opportunistic in their growth strategy with a reluctance to invest in fixed assets that would lock them into certain sectors and thirdly the nature and role of gllanxi in their development. This thesis revisits these claims in the context of the increased significance of globalization for CFBs and their continued rapid economic growth throughout the 1990s. Through an in-depth case-study of four large Taiwanese multinational CFBs located in two distinctive settings (i.e. high-tech and traditional industries), the thesis examines the extent to which the three key characteristics of the CFB, viz. family control, opportunism and gllanxi have acted as barriers to intemationalisation and growth. The thesis argues that these features remain of central importance to large CFBs but the ways in which they work has changed over the last decade in order to facilitate intemationalisation and growth. They have not been major barriers to this process but rather have facilitated it. The case-study findings indicate that although there have been changes in Taiwanese CFBs, these firms still possess their Chinese characteristics and show little sign of converging on to the Anglo-Saxon model of multinational firms.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.490405  DOI: Not available
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