Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.490362
Title: The Control of Unwanted Thoughts in Adolescence Implications for the Meta-Cognitive Model of Childhood Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Author: Hall, Martin
ISNI:       0000 0000 8071 8047
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The Control of Unwanted Thoughts in Adolescence Implications for the Meta-Cognitive Model of Childhood Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Previous research with adults suggests that individuals with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) use maladaptive strategies to control their unwanted thoughts. The main cognitive models ofOCD (Salkovskis, 1985; Wells & Matthews, 1994) specify the particular role these strategies may play in the maintenance ofOCD symptoms. Very little is known about the role these strategies may play in the maintenance ofobsessivecompulsive symptoms in a younger population. The study used a cross-sectional correlational design with a non-clinical adolescent population aged 13 to 16 years old. Participants completed self-report questionnaire measures ofthought control strategies, meta-cognitive beliefs and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The results indicated that more frequent use ofparticular thought control strategies (i.e. punishment, worry and reappraisal) was correlated with a range ofnegative metacognitive beliefs and higher levels ofobsessive-compulsive symptoms. Regression analysis indicated that this model accounted for 27% of the variance in obsessivecompulsive symptoms. Only·meta-cognitive beliefs emerged as a significant independent predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. It is suggested that a conceptualisation ofhow young people appraise, and monitor their thinking is helpful for understanding the nature of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in younger people. Methodological issues are considered and recommendations for further research are made.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: D.Clin.Psychol.--University of East Anglia, 2007 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.490362  DOI: Not available
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