Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.490050
Title: The Juventud de Accion Popular (JAP) in Spain, 1932-1937
Author: Lowe, Simon
Awarding Body: University of Nottingham
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The proclamation of the Second Republic on 14 April 1931 was met with an outpouring of popular jubilation. Municipal elections two days before had returned a majority of monarchist candidates nationally but even the most trenchant supporters of King Alfonso XlII recognised that success in the countryside, where voting could be easily manipulated by political bosses or caciques, was meaningless in the face of a sweeping urban victory for republicans and socialists. In all but seven of Spain's fifty-two provincial capitals, the monarchy had been defeated. Mass politics had definitively announced its arrival, delivering a devastating mandate against a king who was left with little support and little option but to go into exile. Spain had ended overnight a monarchist tradition that went back centuries, installing a genuinely democratic regime for the first time - and without a single shot being fired. Yet less than five years later, with extreme polarisation having taken hold and political coexistence having become ever more precarious, Spain was plunged into a bloody civil war. There were a number of interrelated reasons for so rapid and spectacular a collapse. Promising more than the simple substitution of a president for a king, the Second Republic was welcomed as an opportunity to reform an essentially backward country but it had inherited severe social, economic, religious and even regional cleavages. If political power had changed hands, socio-economic power had not yet done so and there was little patience from those sectors of society who demanded solutions to the crisis. The Republic had also come into existence at a time that was far from propitious.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Nottingham, 2007 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.490050  DOI: Not available
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