Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.489840
Title: Geophysical Investigations on the Najd Fault System
Author: Mogren, Saad M. A.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3413 1437
Awarding Body: University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Current Institution: University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
The Najd fault system (NFS) extends across the Arabian Shield from NW to SE and is considered to be one of the world's largest recognized Proterozoic transcurrent fault zone, exceeding 1100 kIn in length and approximately 350 k.1J1 wide insofar as it is exposed within the Arabian Shield. Interpretation of gravity and magnetic data indicates that the Najd shearing domain extends beyond the exposed Arabian Shield into the whole Arabian plate. The shear movement diminishes towards the northwest due to splaying of the shear strands along the N-S Nabitah weakness planes. Between these major shear zones, some sinistral translation planes are common associated with S-shaped drags of the N-S Nabitah fabric. This study indicates a tectonic escape model is most probable origin fur the Najd fault system. Potential field data were comprehensively used to map the tectonic fabric of the Arabian Shield and the extension of the fault systems beneath the Phanerozoic cover, enabling a better understanding of basement evolution. In addition, ten gravity profiles with detailed GPS levelling were also acquired the field and used to model the Najd fault system. The numerous sets of magnetic and gravity surveys, the time span between them and their varying specification made the integration of these surveys very intricate. On a regional scale, the surveys were merged to form a new seamless high-resolution data set, showing more detailed features of the Arabian Shield and the Cover Rocks than any of the existing compilations. The use of potential field, geological and geochronological data, integrated within a GIS (ArcGISFM environment, has helped to obtain a better understanding of the Precambrian development of the Arabian Shield. IV
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 2004 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.489840  DOI: Not available
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