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Title: Genetic Diversity in Maize (Zea mays L.) Landraces in Ghana
Author: Obeng-Antwi, Kwadwo
Awarding Body: UNIVERSITY OF READING
Current Institution: University of Reading
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
Detailed knowledge ofthe genetic diversity among maize (Zea mays L.) gennplasm is useful for their systematic and efficient use in breeding programmes. The objectives of the study were to (i) characterize Ghanaian landraces for agronomic and morphological traits, (ii) use amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) and agro-morphological traits to detennine the variability of the local landraces and (iii) evaluate the landraces for adaptation to two major maize-growing zones in Ghana. In the molecular studies involving 90 landraces and four improved cultivars, twelve higIily informative AFLP primer combinations produced a total of 536 fragments of which 447 (83%) were polymorphic. Jaccard's similarity coefficients among the accessions ranged from 0.13 to 0.66. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicated that 96% of the variability resided among accessions within groups rather r/ than among groups (4%), necessitating intra-accession variability assessment of two selected landraces, AA007F and AA098F. Euclidean distance estimates from agromorphological traits averaged 6.49 over all accessions and ranged from 2.30 to 13.61, indicating high phenotypic variability among them. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the first six principal components explained 79.2% of the total variability among the accessions. In the intra-Iandrace variability study, Jaccard's similarity coefficients ranged from 0.05 to 0.83 (AA007F) and 0.20 to 0.75 (AA098F). Euclidean distance estimates ranged from 1.90 to 18.80 for AA007F and 2.30 to 14.41 for AA098F, indicating high phenotypic variability within the landraces. There was no significant a~sociation between agronomic performance and the genetic diversity estimates from AFLP. The results will help in maintaining the landrace accessions and serve as a guide in designing breeding strategies that utilize Ghanaian maize genetic resources effectively.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.487481  DOI: Not available
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