Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.487255
Title: A Paralogy Based Strategy for Identifying Regulatory Elements in Mammalian Genomes
Author: Holtom, Benjamin J.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3581 0087
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
The massive advancements in genomics over recent years has not only provided scope to examine what is shared between the genomes of multiple species but also a unique opportunity to investigate that which is responsible for the differences between species of interest. By comparing the proteomes of two species, certain genes can be' clustered and defined as 'inparalogs' - duplicated genes which are respectively unique to each of the species in question having arisen at a time-point subsequent to the speciation event that separated the two lineages in question. Here I report on several analyses that make use of inparalogous genes identified in the mouse genome with' reference to its close relative the rat. Firstly I describe the implementation of a novel .. ) investigative procedure that identifies regions of intragenomic conservation within the upstream sequences of inparalogous gene clusters and report upon the level of resolution that this approach offers with respect to identifying regulatory elements in genomic sequences. In addition to this study, I also describe an investigation into the density of interspersed repeat elements observed in the neighbourhood of inparalogous mouse genes which revealed a marked enrichment of long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs), highlighting a possible role for these sequences in the evolution of gene duplicates in the mouse genome.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Oxford, 2008 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.487255  DOI: Not available
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