Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.486488
Title: The development and evaluation of an integrated nursing approach to delivering targeted interventions based on health needs assessment
Author: McCormick, Deirdre
Awarding Body: Glasgow Caledonian University
Current Institution: Glasgow Caledonian University
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The aim of this Action Research study was to evaluate the development of an integrated nursing team delivering targeted interventions based on Health Needs Assessment in one primary health care team. The study was located within a Local Health Care Cooperative in an urban area of Scotland. Participants included 6 general practitioners, 2 health visitors, 3 district nurses, 2 practice nurses, 2 nursing auxiliaries and a treatment room nurse. The introduction of the integrated community nursing approach was mapped across a four Cycle design which took place over two years and two months. This included illumination of the integrated nursing team concept and the nature of the change required for its introduction drawing on a normative re-educative model of change. Data collection approaches included 18 focus groups, 20 individual interviews, participant observation, nursing diaries, and the Team Climate Inventory Questionnaire. Although effort was taken to progress in the collaborative spirit of action research, evidence of team ownership of integrated nursing did not emerge until the fourth and final action cycle. The study illuminates the complexities of achieving integrated nursing approaches and determinants for success. For example, role differences and the differing underlying philosophies for each of the nursing disciplines presented specific challenges. Health needs assessment used as a tool to support the development of integrated nursing, has proved to be of value as a means to overcome boundary issues and securing commitment to integrated working. The findings suggest that for integrated nursing to be effective greater emphasis needs to be placed on the identification of priority areas using a comprehensive health needs assessment where nurses are motivated and can lead developments. The study has demonstrated that the integrated nursing approach may involve complete role overlap or the contribution of specific expertise in the delivery of targeted interventions. The complexity of achieving integrated approaches however demands resources, appropriate facilitation, protected time for key stakeholders to engage in the change process and to optimise opportunities for interprofessional learning.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.486488  DOI: Not available
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