Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.486197
Title: Disorders of emotional containment and their somatic correlates : the protomental nature of addictions, self-harm and non-communicable diseases
Author: Torres, Nuno
Awarding Body: University of Essex
Current Institution: The University of Essex pre-October 2008
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
This study is concerned with the emotional nature of determined forms of illness which seem to be largely determined by stressful social conditions rather than as a consequence of primarily biologic and somatic factors, and have been identified with labels such as 'diseases of comfort', 'lifestyle related diseases', 'degenerative causes of death'. The models we have for understanding the mechanisms by which human subjects are affected by social environment stresses are still tentative, although some of the diversity of the psychosocial factors is reasonab1y well established. This thesis is an exploration of the theories of Wilfred Bion, which offer an under-researched approach to the nature and origin of such conditions. I have chosen three of these conditions as the subject of this study -drug and alcohol dependence, self-harming behaviours and a certain set of psychosomatic conditions - to test whether predictions formulated from the hypotheses are supported by a set of empirical measures. The hypotheses are that a determined type of emotional containment mechanism can affect certain types of health outcomes via disturbing the natural expression of primitive emotional systems embedded in the human organism. These primitive emotional systems are known as basic assumptions or valencies and are of 3 main types: dependence, fight-flight and pairing
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Essex, 2008 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.486197  DOI: Not available
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