Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.485745
Title: The application of electronic detonators to control the environmental impact of blasting
Author: Hosein, Shazad Mustapha
ISNI:       0000 0001 3582 0074
Awarding Body: University of Leeds
Current Institution: University of Leeds
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
In recent years, the interest in electronic detonators has increased due to its reported ability to define sequences that can significantly improve blasting results and lower environmental impact in relation to the mining and quarrying industry. However, few actual scientific studies have been carried out and published. This thesis investigates the use of electronic detonator with the aim of controlling and minimising the environmental impact of blasting. Its use was examined by comparing their performance to current non-electric detonators by performing a series of full scale like-for-like experiments under strict operational procedures in a variety of rock hosts. In addition, two single hole multi deck blasts were carried out to assess the influence of both distance and individual location response. The results obtained indicate that it is not possible to select one electronic detonator timing interval that will give rise to the absolute lowest Peak Particle Velocity for all observation points. However, it showed that it is possible to choose the 'least worst' option for all or just a number of specific monitoring locations. From this it has been possible to establish a methodology that could be used to reduce the peak particle velocities at multiple locations by using single hole blast vibration signatures in conjunction with specific electronic detonator timing intervals. The study has concluded that this would only be possible if, as the blasting pattern encroaches on specific properties, that periodically single hole signature blasts were carried out to establish the shape ofthe relevant actual vibration envelopes. These wave envelopes could be used as the basis for choosing the specific electronic detonator timing intervals to give the lowest common peak particle velocity for the properties concerned thus controlling the environmental impact of blasting.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.485745  DOI: Not available
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