Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.485493
Title: The Impact of US Security and Border Protection Policy Before and After 9/11
Author: Ramirez Partida, Hector R.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3506 3990
Awarding Body: University of Essex
Current Institution: The University of Essex pre-October 2008
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
This thesis is an assessment study of the impact of US security and border protection policy. 11 utilizes key analytical concepts from complex interdependence theory and elaborates a framework in order to examine the impact of US security and border protection policy on the US-Mexico border before and after 9/11.Therefore: this research seeks to answer the next question: do post-9/11 US security and border protection policy responses make any difference to the protection of the US-Mexican land border? Data collected to investigate this question comprise survey analysis and bivariate correlation techniques: all of which are complemented by qualitative information gathered from interviews and doc'umentary analysis. The results of the analysis demonstrate that: other things being equal: the post-9/11 US security and border protection policy responses have marginal effects on the protection of the USMexican land border compared to the pre-9/1l period. In other words: those policy responses make no difference when their perforinance is compared before and after 9/11. The findings also demostrate that, policy negative and indirect effects can emerge. In this way, it is argued that the negative indirect effects of the post-9/11 US security and border protection policy responses are more noticiable compared to the pre-9/11 period; this is' particularly true in the case of the increasing number of deaths of Mexican migants on the borderline. The conclusions derived from this thesis, though tentative, are consistent and show that the US-Mexico land border is more secure, but is not completely safe after 9/11.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: University of Essex, 2008 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.485493  DOI: Not available
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