Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.484983
Title: The modulation of experimental colitis by reactive oxygen species scavengers
Author: Mallon, P. T.
Awarding Body: Queen's University Belfast
Current Institution: Queen's University Belfast
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
Inflammatory bowel disease is a common condition causing debilitating symptoms. Existing treatments are successful in many cases but there are a significant proportion of patients in whom conventional therapy fails or results in significant side effects. Alternative treatments are therefore being sought. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human IBO and experimental colitis. Edaravone and mesna are drugs which have been licenced for use in clinical practice for conditions other than IBO. Edaravone is a potent scavenger of reactive oxygen species such as the hydroxyl ion. It has been shown to reduce long term disability in patients with acute cerebral infarction. It is known that free radicals play an important role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury following cerebral infarction. Mesna is licenced for use in the prevention of haemorrhagic cystitis induced by cyclophosphamide chemotherapy protocols. Mesna has been shown to be a scavenger of hydroxyl and hypochlorus free radicals. Mesna, when administered topically has reduced the severity of experimental colitis in TNBS rats. The aim of the experiments in this thesis was to determine the effectiveness of edaravone and mesna at suppressing experimental colitis This thesis had demonstrated that edaravone is effective at suppressing experimental colitis when administered prophylactically. It has a partial benefit in established colitis. Mesna however, when administered orally appears to have no impact on experimental colitis. Edaravone may have a role to playas an alternative therapy for lBO, further trials are however needed to prove its efficacy in patients with IBD.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Queen's University Belfast, 2008 Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.484983  DOI: Not available
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