Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.480790
Title: Studies on the effects of field and storage environments on potato blackleg and bacterial soft rot, with reference to disease control
Author: Mackay, James Murdoch
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1983
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Abstract:
The frequency and extent of contamination by the "blackleg and bacterial soft rot organism, Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica , of seed potato stocks in the North of Scotland was assessed. The presence of the organism in potato stem lesions was investigated. The survival of the organism in the lenticels and on the surface of contaminated tubers was examined in relation to the storage environment, in particular temperature, relative humidity, 'curing' and condensation. Factors affecting disease expression in the field were studied, in particular fertiliser, sprouting, damage and diseased seed. Bacterial soft rot of seed tubers in store and after planting was examined in relation to storage relative humidity and temperature, physiological age of the tuber, level of nitrogen and moisture in growing medium and level of reducing sugars in the tuber. Cultivar resistance to blackleg and tuber and stem inoculations of the blackleg organism was assessed, A test utilizing micropropagated potato plants to assess cultivar resistance was devised. A method of controlling blackleg and bacterial soft rot by heat treatment was developed. Blackleg was eradicated by immersing tubers in hot water. Heated air was also effective in killing the organism, Powdery scab (Spongospora subterranea) and black scurf (Rhizoctonia solani) of potatoes were also controlled by hot water treatment.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.480790  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Agronomy Agronomy Plant diseases Horticulture
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