Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.480373
Title: Some aspects of the relationship between certain epifaunistic insects and their hosts
Author: Buckle, Alan P.
Awarding Body: University of London
Current Institution: Royal Holloway, University of London
Date of Award: 1975
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Abstract:
Certain aspects of the relationship between small mammals and their epifaunistic communities were investigated in a habitat supporting three rodent species. Preliminary studies indicated that, in an area of rough grass and bramble shrub, a community of rodents existed harbouring a wide range of flea ectoparasite species, as well as the apparently rare beetle Leptinus testaceus Muller. Techniques were developed, and are described, for the accurate assessment of the level of epifaunistic infestation of rodents. The infestation of various host species, sex and age categories were compared during the different phases of the host's annual population cycle. The rates of re-infestation of hosts and the levels of infestation with fleas with respect to home range size and migratory/ sedentary host categories were also investigated. The underlying cause of certain observed similarities in the level of infestation of some host categories was studied by the use of mark and recapture of fleas. The possibilities offered by this method of study of ectoparasites and their hosts are discussed. In order to contrast the situation observed in the flea infestation of small mammals a study of the association between hibernating hedgehogs and their flea ectopara-sites was undertaken. A method was developed for the assessment of the alimentary relations of a flea population with its host and this approach, together with the use of other techniques, indicated certain behavioural modifications which allowed the fleas to successfully parasitise their hibernating hosts.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.480373  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Parasitology
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