Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.477474
Title: In search of hemispheric asymmetry : an analysis of the significance of the phenomenon with normal subjects
Author: Williams, S. M.
Awarding Body: Sussex University
Current Institution: University of Sussex
Date of Award: 1979
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Abstract:
Within the field of research on hemispheric asymmetry there is an area involving an indirect approach using normal subjects. The problem is that research in the area seems to face a limitation on the level of psychological function which it can illuminate. In particular, such research appears to have been successful in challenging our understanding of the phonological level of language processes or the short-term level of memory processes but not that of levels beyond. With auditory stimuli it was supposed for the purposes of this dissertation that an endeavour to reduce artificiality (both theoretical and experimental) might extend the applicability of this kind of research beyond the levels mentioned. However this supposition of extendability could not be maintained, following a series of six monaural and two dichotic ear-difference experiments. The results of the experiments gave no more than weak support to some fresh hypotheses about how the applicability of the research to further functions might be achieved, nor did such hypotheses indicate promising lines of future investigation. Doubts were floated about whether ear differences in normal subjects reflect hemispheric asymmetry at all; although it is possible to construct reasons why specifically those further levels of function (beyond the phonological/short-term) showing hemispheric asymmetry might inevitably fail to be reflected by ear differences in normal subjects. Such doubts were broadly elaborated and speculated upon rather generally.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.477474  DOI: Not available
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