Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.476661
Title: The mechanism of development of spina bifida in the chick
Author: Watt, Diana J.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1977
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Full text unavailable from EThOS. Please try the link below.
Access through Institution:
Abstract:
The effect of the teratogenic agents, Insulin, Janus Green B, Lrthyroxine and 3-Acetylpyridine, as well as hypoxic and hyperoxic conditions, on neural tube development in the early chick embryo are investigated in relation to the extension of the normal necrotic zone at the neural fold region. Several substances involved in NAD+ metabolism are also considered as possible anti- teratogenic agents to Insulin and 3-Acetylpyridine. The teratogens and anti-teratogens were administered to embryos explanted by the New technique at St.7 of development and in the case of insulin, also in ovo. Due to the view that cell necrosis is an important consideration in teratology, the embryos were examined both at. the light- and electron-microscope levels for evidence of an increase in the physiological zone of necrosis at the neural fold region responsible for defects in neural tube development, including spina bifida. The result of biochemical estimations of NAD+ NADH, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP carried out on insulin- and 3-acetylpyridine- treated neural tubes when considered along with previous reports on the effect of insulin and 3-acetylpyridine on NAD+metabolism, now lead to new proposals to explain the mechanism of action of the teratogens on the neural folds. Also discussed is the suggestion that a gradient of nutrients and essential molecules is present and responsible for the appearance of the normal necrotic zone at the neural folds. This view receives support from recent reports that a gradient of essential molecules is responsible for the commitment of mesodermal cells to a particular during chick limb development.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.476661  DOI: Not available
Share: