Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.454636
Title: The Glasgow novel
Author: Elliot, Robert David
ISNI:       0000 0001 2436 5440
Awarding Body: University of Glasgow
Current Institution: University of Glasgow
Date of Award: 1977
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Abstract:
This thesis is a study of the Glasgow novel from its beginnings in the early nineteenth century till the present day. After a brief look at the issues raised by Scottish industrial fiction in general we go on to approach the Glasgow genre in the light of the themes and groupings it has thrown up, and in doing so a chronological history emerges indirectly. We find no all embracing theory, but a number of significant points are raised. Foremost stands a continuing split between a vision of the city as an industrial centre and, conversely, as a centre of culture. Chapter One shows the novelist's view of materialism and ambition in the Victorian city and how this changes as we enter the twentieth century. The next Chapter examines the Glasgow examples of kailyard fiction. Chapter Three then traces the increasing awareness of lower life in the novel and the technical approaches it involves, and the next Chapter looks in detail at an offshoot of this - the gang novel. Chapter Five, on politics, gives the lie to the myth of Red Clyde si d e, and confirms the split approach to the city. Chapter Six views the Glasgow novel through its. apprehension of religion and its replacement as the genre ages by an interest in the individual, Chapter Seven looks at the many different manifestations of pride associated with the city, while Eight and Nine deal with the peculiar contributions of respectively women and children, Chapter Ten shows how the city's past has evoked various responses - some superficial others strongly felt - and Chapters Eleven and Twelve give a detailed look at the two most important writers to have worked on the city. Finally the Glasgow genre is set in context - against the wider background of both Scottish and English regional fiction.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.454636  DOI: Not available
Keywords: PN0080 Criticism ; PR English literature
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