Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.449225
Title: The formulation of a methodology for the examination of the impact of planning decisions on the coastal environments of Highland Scotland
Author: Baugh, I. D. H.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1976
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
Abstract:
An outline methodology for the examination of the impact of planning decisions on the coastal environments of Highland Scotland is formulated. This enables the examination and assessment of the impact of planning decisions on the physical and visual environments of the coastline. A national scale survey (1:25,000) of the coastline provides information on physiography, land use, development along the coastline of Highland Scotland. New techniques of landscape evaluation and environmental impact analysis are developed for use in the coastal environment. Landscape evaluation reveals higher scenic values in the SW (the county of Argyll). Computer techniques are employed to produce a map of the coastline of Scotland, from which the most accurate figure for the length of the Scottish coast to date is computed. A description of the planning process reveals the differences between Scotland and the rest of the UK, as well as the problems and pressures which face Scottish planners as a result of the nature of the environment and the pressures for development and conservation facing the coastline at the present time. Detailed analysis of the impact of planning decisions in the county of Argyll shows that the coastline and coastal zone has received an increasing share of planning applications between 1950 and 1974, when compared with the inland and insular parts of the county. Planning decisions are more concentrated in the coastal zone as a result of a trend to an increasingly peripheral and oceanic distribution of economic activity. The absolute numbers of planning applications in the coastal zone have more than doubled in the last 25 years and so too has the number of different types of planning applications. The increasing scale of development means that planning decisions have a greater impact on the environment. Results of detailed analysis in Argyll are tentatively extrapolated to the coastline of Highland Scotland.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.449225  DOI: Not available
Share: