Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.448147
Title: Some Aspects of Interfacial Bonding in Composites with Special Reference to Carbon and Glass Fibre Reinforced Plastics.
Author: Arrington, M.
Awarding Body: University of Sussex
Current Institution: University of Sussex
Date of Award: 1976
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Abstract:
This thesis illustrates the importance of interfacial bonding in determining composite properties and describes the research programme carried out to investigate interfacial bonding in carbon fibre reinforced polyester ~ni:I epoxy composites. This involved measurement of bond strengths in simple, single fibre, micromechanical debond test specimens am relating the results to bulk composite properties,such as·interlaminar shear strength and the work of fracture. O~be~ a~pects investigated included the effect of ~ irradiation on fibre, plastic and composite properties, with the aim of using in situ ~ initiated polymerisation for coating fibres: and the hybrid effect in mixed type I/type II carbon fibre composites. One .'Of the main -experimental methods used to study the .mechanical deformation processes both in composite and mircromechanical specimens was acoustic emission. This is a technique in which the low.level stress waves, generated by material deformation, are detected and analysed. Some specimens were also examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The literature survey examines (i) The role of interfaces in composites (ii) More general composite mechanics and materials aspects (iii) ·Acoustic emission and its application to composites. The most important findings were (a) 2( Irradiation of type I fibres resulted in an enhanced modulus (b) Measured values of the tensile bond strength varied from .6 MNm -2 for type I oxidised t~ 4.9 MNm -2 for untreated type II fibres. (c) The existence of a hybrid effect in mixed type I/type II carbon fibre composites. Finally new areas of work, arising from this project, were outlined.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Doctoral Thesis - University of Sussex. Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.448147  DOI: Not available
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