Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.446211
Title: Compilation, validation and implementation of an anti-inflammatory diet
Author: Wood, Adrian D.
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2008
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Abstract:
The objective of this project is to assess whether there is a role for dietary salicylates in disease prevention. An accurate, sensitive, and reliable method for the measurement of salicylic acid levels in commonly consumed foods was utilised and a comprehensive database on salicylate levels in plant-based foods was compiled. The database was subsequently employed to estimate dietary salicylic acid intakes of a Scottish population, Indian immigrants living in Scotland, and to investigate the hypothesis that low colon cancer rates in India compared with Scotland are due to habitually consuming a diet rich in salicylic acid. Estimated intakes of dietary salicylic acid in Indian volunteers were approximately two fold greater than Scottish volunteers. Furthermore, there were marked differences in dietary patterns between the two ethnic groups. However, trials in which plasma and urinary salicylates were determined following consumption of salicylate rich foods indicated that the bioavailability of dietary salicylates varied markedly between individuals. This suggests that diet may not be a source of potentially beneficial salicylic acid in all individuals. Several other phenolic acids with potentially anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and anti-atherogenic properties were also identified in salicylate-rich foods and beverages. Consequently, further investigation is required to discern if the health benefits of a diet rich in fruits and vegetables are due to habitually high intakes of salicylic acid or to other component(s) of fruit and vegetables that may be co-associated with the phenolic acid.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.446211  DOI: Not available
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