Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.442079
Title: Utilisation of research findings by graduate nurses and midwives and their attitude towards research
Author: Veeramah, Rangasamy Ven
ISNI:       0000 0001 3544 673X
Awarding Body: University of Greenwich
Current Institution: University of Greenwich
Date of Award: 2007
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Abstract:
The aim of this study was to assess the impact of research education on the attitudes toward research and use of research findings in practice in a sample of graduate nurses and midwives. It also examined how nurse and midwifery teachers could work collaboratively with clinical staff to enhance their use of research evidence to inform their practice. The main barriers to research utilisation and strategies that could facilitate the use of research findings in nursing and midwifery practice were also explored. The project was carried out in three phases and aspects of the theory of diffusion of innovation and the theory of planned behaviour were used as the theoretical framework to inform data collection. For the first phase, a cross-sectional survey using a self-completed postal questionnaire was sent to 340 graduates. A response rate of 56% was obtained. A large number stated that following graduation, their search and critical appraisal skills had improved, expressed positive attitudes towards research and reported using research findings in practice. The second phase explored further the extent of research utilisation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 respondents from a range of specialities. All participants claimed that they used research findings to a large extent and provided examples to support their answers. The third phase, using a structured questionnaire, explored strategies that nurse and midwifery teachers could use to help nurses and midwives to improve their use of research findings. Forty link teachers and 62 clinical managers took part. Effective strategies identified included enabling clinical staff to access and critique research papers; run research workshops on site; set up journal clubs or research interest groups and undertake joint research projects.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.442079  DOI: Not available
Keywords: RT Nursing
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