Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.429592
Title: The making of London : representations of London in contemporary fiction
Author: Groes, Sebastian.
ISNI:       0000 0001 2013 1743
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
Over the past twenty-five years London has been the focus of an extraordinary outburst of creative literary energy, which this thesis tries to capture and map. lain Sinclair, Maureen Duffy, Michael Moorcock, Martin Amis, Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, Monica Ali and J. G. Ballard have all produced textual Londons that are intensely critical of the rapidly changing nature of the city under the Thatcher decade and New Labour's perpetuation of the Thatcherite programme This shared opposition makes it possible, through an idiosyncratic act of the imagination, to carve out an independent imaginary London. Because the literary British tradition has strong ties with humanist traditions, rather than using the contemporary London novel as the vehicle for test-driving theoretical models and the often ahistorical perspective offered by post-structuralist theories, this thesis goes back to the open models of literary analysis found in the work of, amongst others, Eco and Calvino. This work also recuperates urban semiotics as a working model: by intervening at the levels of signs that are placed in specific social and historical contexts, the changing life of London as a system may be assessed Central to the analysis is the way in which these authors recuperate the spoken voice in writing, creating a dialogic, ambivalent model of 'London' that works against contemporary a historicism. Another important aspect is the way in which these writers draw upon intertextual models to reclaim the city in human terms.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.429592  DOI: Not available
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