Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.425272
Title: The self-schema in relation to developed delusions in schizophrenia
Author: Priovolou, Ageliki.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3501 905X
Awarding Body: Leeds Metropolitan University
Current Institution: Leeds Beckett University
Date of Award: 2006
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Abstract:
This study was conducted to investigate the self-schema of paranoid schizophrenics in relation to developed delusions. A sample of 60 patients (30 with delusions of grandeur, and 30 with delusions of persecution) in remission of their symptoms, as well as a control group (61 non-psychotic individuals), completed the Young maladaptive schema questionnaire (Young, 1990), the Beck depression inventory (Beck, Rush, Shaw and Emery, 1979), and the Rosenberg self-esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965). A pattern of maladaptive self-schemas, with moderate scores in depression and low self-esteem was found, in paranoid schizophrenics. Schizophrenic patients with delusions of persecution had an average of 8.8 maladaptive schemas (the prevalent ones being abandonment, mistrust, selfsacrifice, insufficient self-control, social undesirability and dependence). Schizophrenic patients with delusions of grandeur had an average of 9.0 maladaptive schemas (the prevalent ones being abandonment, mistrust, selfsacrifice, insufficient self-control, unrelenting standards, and entitlement). The different maladaptive schemas found in patients with delusions of grandeur, and those with delusions of persecution, indicate a relationship between the self-schema and delusions, and suggest that self-schema influences the content of the delusions. Delusion formation appears to reflect an interaction between pre-existing beliefs of the self -i.e. personality, emotions and dysfunctional cognitive processes- and the environment. Emotion also appears to play a role in delusion formation by affecting reasoning. A qualita~ive study was also conducted to investigate the acquisition of the maladaptive schemas in this population. Another sample of 20 paranoid schizophrenic patients (10 with delusions of grandeur and 10 with delusions of persecution in remission of their symptoms) as well as a group of 10 nonpsychotic individuals were interviewed. The analysis suggests that patients with delusions of grandeur as children may not have paid enough attention to the environment developing schemas without relevant childhood experiences, while patients with delusions of persecution may have paid too much attention to the environment, as children, claiming childhood experiences without holding the relevant maladaptive schemas. The results indicate that these patients may base their thinking on conceptual processes starting early in life. The findings lead to a proposal of a model to account for the formation of delusions of grandeur and persecution. This in turn leads to proposed modifications of therapeutic procedures regarding paranoid schizophrenic patients.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.425272  DOI: Not available
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