Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.415015
Title: Portugal and Portuguese India, 1870-1961
Author: Ethell, Bernard Dale.
Awarding Body: School of Oriental and African Studies (University of London)
Current Institution: SOAS, University of London
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
Very little has been written on the history of Goa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries prior to the annexation of the territory by the Indian Union in 1961. This study therefore focuses on the period from the 1870's to the end of Portuguese rule, using sources in Portuguese and English. It addresses the following topics in particular: 1) Portuguese perceptions of the colony in the period, the character of Portuguese rule, and (to a lesser extent) the responses of Goan society. 2) Since the colony was not economically valuable to Portugal, the steps taken to improve its situation, especially through the AngloPortuguese Commercial Treaty of 1878, and the story of its failure. 3) The major investment by British capital in the Goa railway, and the issues it faced in its history. 4) Other problems resulting from Goa's position as a dependant enclave of British India, such as contraband and issues of security for British India in the Second World war. 5) The differing British attitudes to Goa, and Britain's role as a reluctant intermediary between Portugal and India. 6) The contrast between the evident Portuguese sentiment and feeling of attachment to its foothold in Asia, and the lack of serious commitment to its preservation. 7) The attitude of the Salazar government and its diplomatic struggle with India to justify Portugal's retention of the territory as part of the Portuguese family. The thesis shows that, despite the special nature of the Goan culture, influenced over centuries of Portuguese rule, and by the Catholic religion, a pattern of attitude and policy was set over decades in Goa, in India, in Portugal and in Britain which helps explain the absorption of Goa by India.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.415015  DOI: Not available
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