Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.414638
Title: Rate effects of rapid loading in clay soils
Author: Meca, Juan Balderas
ISNI:       0000 0001 3390 7483
Awarding Body: University of Sheffield
Current Institution: University of Sheffield
Date of Award: 2005
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Abstract:
The study of the relationship between the shear strength of the clay and the rate at which it is loaded is relevant to the application of a new rapid load pile testing technique called Statnamic. There are problems associated with interpreting the test results in clay soils due to the non linear variation in shear resistance with rate of shearing. An investigation has been conducted for two clay soils which were used in an associated research project. These were a reconstituted kaolin clay (KSS) used for model pile tests and undisturbed glacial clay taken from a full scale prototype pile testing site near Grimsby. Monotonic and multistage strain controlled triaxial tests were carried out on both clays using a, pneumatic computer, controlled rapid load triaxial system at rates from 0.001 mm/s to 200 mm/s. The shear strength increased and the excess pore pressure decreased as the rate of shearing increased. A power law was proposed relating dynamic and static shear strength. The damping coefficients and hence the rate effects, defined as a function of strain, were similar for both clays Based on the triaxial test results and a back analysis of Statnamic and "static" constant rate of penetration data from the associated model and full scale pile tests in both clays, a non-linear model has been proposed relating the static resistance of a pile to the measured Statnamic load taking into account the rate effects and the inertia of the pile. The non-linear model was used to develop a new multistage interpretation method for the analysis of Statnamic tests in clays.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.414638  DOI: Not available
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