Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.413350
Title: From detection of complex motion to descriptions of moving surfaces in human vision
Author: Atkinson, Philip A.
Awarding Body: Aston University
Current Institution: Aston University
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
A preliminary study by Freeman et al (1996b) has suggested that when complex patterns of motion elicit impressions of 2-dimensionality, odd-item-out detection improves given targets can be differentiated on the basis of surface properties. Their results can be accounted for, it if is supposed that observers are permitted efficient access to 3-D surface descriptions but access to 2-D motion descriptions is restricted. To test the hypothesis, a standard search technique was employed, in which targets could be discussed on the basis of slant sign. In one experiment, slant impressions were induced through the summing of deformation and translation components. In a second theory were induced through the summing of shear and translation components. Neither showed any evidence of efficient access. A third experiment explored the possibility that access to these representations may have been hindered by a lack of grouping between the stimuli. Attempts to improve grouping failed to produce convincing evidence in support of life. An alternative explanation is that complex patterns of motion are simply not processed simultaneously. Psychophysical and physiological studies have, however, suggested that multiple mechanisms selective for complex motion do exist. Using a subthreshold summation technique I found evidence supporting the notion that complex motions are processed in parallel. Furthermore, in a spatial summation experiment, coherence thresholds were measured for displays containing different numbers of complex motion patches. Consistent with the idea that complex motion processing proceeds in parallel, increases in the number of motion patches were seen to decrease thresholds, both for expansion and rotation. Moreover, the rates of decrease were higher than those typically expected from probability summation, thus implying mechanisms are available, which can pool signals from spatially distinct complex motion flows.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Phd
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.413350  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Optometry
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