Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.410483
Title: Five children and a paradigm : the cultural construction of romantic and utilitarian concepts of childhood
Author: Lunnun, John Arnold
ISNI:       0000 0001 3614 0572
Awarding Body: University of Central Lancashire
Current Institution: University of Central Lancashire
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This thesis identifies and challenges two distinct modes of describing contemporary childhood and traces these two modes to their roots in the philosophies of mind that engendered the Enlightemnent. It is argued that these two modes, labelled for ease of reference Romantic and Utilitarian as culturally constructed during the Enlightenment are no longer capable of containing the meaning of childhood within a rapidly changing technological environment. Furthermore, it is argued that the adherents to these two modes perpetuate a continuous debate between these ideas of childhood that is inconclusive and as such does a disservice to children. By adopting a multi-disciplinary approach this thesis contributes to the body of work already existing on childhood development by contextulising the research within cultural studies. This approach enables childhood to be seen as a cultural construct within human social development rather than as a 'unique' time that is preserved by adults for each subsequent generation of children. Returning childhood to the 'mainstream' of society not only enables a negotiated settlement between the two modes of childhood to be proposed but also suggests a unique way or remodelling childhood that engages with the social, cultural, scientific and teclmological developments that are and will be faced by contemporary and future generations.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.410483  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Social work
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