Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.405391
Title: Behaviour therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic low back pain : a single case series
Author: Edwards, Joanne.
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 2003
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Abstract:
Medical interventions have limited success when applied to individuals with chronic low back pain. Psychological interventions have been developed in order to offer a way of managing chronic pain. These are generally based on behavioural or cognitive behavioural theories. Research indicates that both behaviour therapy (BT) and cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) are effective in the treatment of chronic pain. However, it is unclear whether CBT is effective as a stand-alone treatment or if it has an additive effect following the presentation ofBT. Chronic pain can affect individuals in a number of ways. Depression, disability and pain related anxiety were considered in the present study. Six participants took part in this single case design study, a multiple baseline was implemented followed by either six or 12 weeks of intervention. Three individuals received BT followed by CBT, the remaining three received CBT alone. Findings of the study were mixed. When BT was considered there were no consistent findings. There was no evidence that CBT added anything to BT when disability was considered. There was weak evidence that psychological distress may respond to CBT following the presentation ofBT. CBT showed mixed results regarding the daily measures of negative pain related beliefs. Phase change measures often showed a different picture to daily measures. There was limited evidence that CBT could provide a decrease in disability and psychological distress. While no firm conclusions could be drawn regarding negative pain related thoughts. Methodological and theoretical issues were discussed in relation to the findings. Suggestions for futures research were also presented.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.405391  DOI: Not available
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