Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.404452
Title: A case study of the learning preferences of Chinese distance learners
Author: Nield, Kevin
Awarding Body: Sheffield Hallam University
Current Institution: Sheffield Hallam University
Date of Award: 2004
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Abstract:
This study is primarily concerned with two overarching "how" questions. The first question is "how are the teaching, learning and assessment preferences of Chinese Hong Kong learners met by the distance learning courses offered?" Specifically it concerns the feasibility of transferring a western course to the Hong Kong market. The second question interrogates the usefulness of models that measure learning style in categorising learners and making recommendations from them regarding their learning preferences. To enable these questions to be answered six research propositions concerning the learning preferences of Chinese learners were identified. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken. This was founded upon two theoretical building blocks of national culture and learning style theory. This exploration of cultural theory is extended to an examination of differences in Chinese culture that may impact upon educational preferences. To investigate the second building block of learning style theory, certain theories of learning style that attempt to measure learning style are critically examined in depth. To bring cultural differences and learning style theory together a capstone is used. This capstone is six learning preferences of the Chinese learner. These preferences are founded upon application of cultural and learning style theory and other, mainly western perceptions, of the Chinese learner. This section of the literature provides a bridge between cultural and learning style theory and the research. The research questions are answered by using a single case study. The case study focuses upon the teaching, learning and assessment preferences of twenty-five Hong Kong Chinese students studying for two UK Higher Education awards by distance learning. The study makes three contributions to knowledge. First, the study concludes that in transferring the courses from the British culture to the Hong Kong Chinese culture that the study materials in a western context may be appropriate but the method of delivery may not. Second, applying measurements of learning style to national groups is challenged as inappropriate methods of teaching and learning may be advocated and appropriate methods may be ignored. Finally, of the theoretical propositions, only two are supported. These are that this group of learners dislikes classroom discussion and that the role of the teacher/lecturer is didactic.
Supervisor: Johnson, Sylvia ; Williams, Mary Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ed.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.404452  DOI: Not available
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