Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.394056
Title: An urban study of central Winchester applying GIS methodology to twentieth century directory and complementary sources
Author: Pinhorne, Craig M. W.
Awarding Body: University of Southampton
Current Institution: University of Winchester
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
This thesis has adopted a methodology that few others within the field of urban-historical geography have implemented. The application of a Geographical Informnation System (GIS) to the examination of the chosen data has allowed a raft of analytical techniques to be employed. These are used to examine both the functional and morphological structure of the city - two elements usually considered in isolation - and explore possible causative factors relating to its development. Particularly useful in this examination are trade directories which provide a data source that to a large extent, has been overlooked within academic research. The detail of information they contain allows them to be linked to complementary material such as rate books and Ordnance Survey maps. This rich archive forms the basis of three period pictures that this research has developed to gain insight into the city of Winchester during the twentieth century. The study recognises and attributes change to a number of operators including religion, monarchy and military. The emergence of a further dominant influence, the planning system, is clearly illustrated by its impact on the towns cape of the city and the functions which lined its streets. Mapping rateable values illustrates that low value areas, predominantly residential, were fundamentally influenced during the study period. The redevelopment of these sites proved instrumental in allowing the historic core to develop into a Central Business District (CBD). The implications of this decision have been explored, as many functions were dependant on this residential population.
Supervisor: Dicks, Brian ; Bentley, John Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.394056  DOI: Not available
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