Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.381453
Title: Towards the application of artificial intelligence techniques for discrete event simulation
Author: Flitman, Andrew
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 1986
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Abstract:
The possibility of incorporating Artificial Intelligence (A.I) techniques into Visual Interactive Discrete Event Simulation was examined. After a study the current state of the art, work was undertaken to investigate the usefulness of PROLOG as a simulation language. This led to the development of a working Simulation Engine, allowing simulations to be developed quickly. The way PROLOG facilitated development of the engine indicated a possible usefulness as a medium for controlling external simulations. Tests on the feasibility of this were made resulting in the development of an assembler link which allows PROLOG to remotely communicate with and control procedural language programs resident on a separate microcomputer. Experiments using this link were then made to test the application of A.I. techniques to current visual simulations. Studies were carried out on the controlling of the simulation, the monitoring and learning from a simulation, the use of simulation as a window to expert system performance, and on the manipulation of the simulation. This study represents a practical attempt to understand and develop the possible uses of A.I. techniques within visual interactive simulation. The thesis concludes with a discussion of the advantages attainable through such a merger of techniques, followed by areas in which the research may be expanded.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Science and Engineering Research Council (Great Britain) (SERC)
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.381453  DOI: Not available
Keywords: QA76 Electronic computers. Computer science. Computer software Computer software Bionics Signal processing Information theory
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