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Title: The coming one : an intertextual study of Psalm 118 in the Gospel of John
Author: Brunson, Andrew Craig
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
The thesis focuses on the presence and function of Ps 118 in the Gospel of John, in light of the psalm's literary context and its interpretation in Judaism. Chapter 1 lays out the three methodological approaches used: intertextuality, mediation of Scripture in intertestamental sources, and respect for wider context fields in quotation. Chapter 2 surveys the use of Ps 118 outside the NT, with special attention to its original historical context and its role in Jewish liturgy. The Synoptic use of the psalm is examined in ch. 3, with each evangelist treated separately before addressing the relationship of the Synoptics to John. In ch. 4 the broader context of John's use of Ps 118 is explored, with attention focused especially on the development of a New Exodus pattern in John. Chapter 5 analyzes the quotation of Ps 118 in the Entrance Narrative, concluding that Jesus' entry is depicted as the New Exodus return of Yahweh to end the state of continuing exile and defeat Israel's enemies. Chapter 6 argues for recognition in the Gospel of a coming-sent motif linked with the psalm, which aids in the identification of Jesus' function and person with those of Yahweh. Chapter 7 examines more closely the quotation of Zech 9.9, and proposes a re-reading of the Entrance Narrative in light of the conclusions reached in chs. 5 and 6. Chapters 8-10 attempt to establish the presence and explore the function of four additional allusions to Ps 118. It is argued that Ps 118 is alluded to in the Abraham Discourse (John 8.56), the Shepherd Discourse (John 10.7, 9), at the Feast of Dedication (John 10.24-25), and in Jesus' prayer in the Lazarus Narrative (John 11.41-42). The final chapter summarizes the results of the study and suggests some possible implications.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.367373  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Judaism Philosophy Religion
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