Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.364484
Title: An experimental and theoretical investigation of heat transfer in automotive exhaust catalysts
Author: Day, Edward George Wedgewood
Awarding Body: Coventry University
Current Institution: Coventry University
Date of Award: 2001
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Abstract:
The need for a catalytic converter within the exhaust system of automotive engines in order to meet emission regulations and the associated costs of its design and testing have meant that a computational model is highly desirable. A number of models have been developed with increasing completeness and versatility. Each model has used approximations and simplifications to reduce the computation time and to enable their use as a design tool to be viable. The present project utilises a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD to model the initial stages of a catalytic converter in a motor vehicle starting from cold. The ultimate aim is to be able to use the model to improve the efficiency of a catalytic converter by reducing the time taken for light-off. A detailed single channel study is utilised to provide the geometric versatility of the model and to assess the feasibility of using a thin film approach (with heat transfer coefficient as a function of distance down the monolith) which can be utilised in a full equivalent continuum model. The results of this unique study show that the heat transfer from the gas to the monolith can be reliably quantified for a given geometry under common input variables. For typical ceramic substrate monoliths the heat transfer towards the rear of the channels was given by a Nusselt number of approximately 3.5 with elevated heat transfer in the developing region near the channel entrance. Sinusoidal metallic substrate monoliths had a fully developed heat transfer of 2.4.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.364484  DOI: Not available
Keywords: exhaust systems Thermodynamics Internal combustion engines Air Pollution Air Pollution
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