Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.347769
Title: Polyolefin-reinforced cement in tension and flexure
Author: Keer, J. G.
Awarding Body: University of Surrey
Current Institution: University of Surrey
Date of Award: 1983
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Abstract:
The work reported in this thesis is principally concerned with the experimental and theoretical behaviour of polypropylene- and high modulus polyethylene-reinforced cements in tension and in flexure. Polypropylene-reinforced cement has a proposed application as a thin sheet cladding material and developments in associated thin sheet fibre-reinforced cement technologies are discussed. Existing theories to account for the tensile and flexural behaviour of fibre-reinforced cements are reviewed. A comprehensive theoretical treatment is presented for the complete behaviour in loading-unloading-reloading in direct tension of a cement composite, reinforced by continuous, aligned fibres. The treatment is modified to account for the measured non-linear stress-strain behaviour exhibited by polyolefin fibres. A satisfactory comparison is drawn between theoretical and experimental results for residual strains, reloading moduli and energy absorption during an unloading/reloading cycle. It la argued that an existing approach for the prediction of the flexural load-deflection relationship of a fibre cement composite is inappropriate and an alternative 'crack development' approach is presented, which yields a more realistic comparison with experimental data from flexural tests on polyolefin-reinforced cement composites. The behaviour of specimens under cyclic flexural loading and in reversed flexure through zero is discussed. The theoretical developments are expected to be generally applicable to a range of fibre-reinforced brittle matrix composites.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.347769  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Organic chemistry
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