Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.346845
Title: The Church Socialist League 1906-1923 : origins, development and disintegration
Author: Goodfellow, I.
Awarding Body: Durham University
Current Institution: Durham University
Date of Award: 1983
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Abstract:
This thesis, in examining the life cycle of the Church Socialist League provides a case study in Christian Socialism. The C. S. L. was the third Anglican Society to be founded in the phase of Christian Socialism that arose in the last quarter of the nineteenth century: it emerged within that tradition in response to the increasing political momentum of the Labour Movement which first achieved significant Parliamentary presence in the 1906 General Election. This study examines the context in which the League arose, the membership, organisational development and life of the League and the conflicts and circumstances which led to its dissolution. The society was distinguished from its predecessors by an explicit avowal of Socialism combined with an open attitude in theology and churchmanship. Within the League's membership three elements may be detected - Socialist, Catholic and Intellectual. The history of the League demonstrates the interplay between these elements in the context of the circumstances of the time, notably developments within the general field of the Labour and Socialist movement and the war and its aftermath. As a result the character of the League changed markedly in the course of its existence. Each of the three elements made a bid to control the League. As a result of internal tensions and external circumstances the League broke up: it was a failure in synthesis. In its full commitment to political and economic Socialism it posed acutely the central problem of Christian. Socialism - the relation between secular political principles and Christian theology - and demonstrated the difficulty, and perhaps the impossibility, of giving stable and effective institutional expression to the relationship between two 'ideologies'.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.346845  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Philosophy Philosophy Religion
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