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Title: Genotype-nutrition interactions in breeding sows
Author: Sinclair, Anna Grace
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1997
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The interaction effects of genotype and nutrition on the performance of sows during lactation is still poorly understood; this series of experiments explored the factors contributing to breed differences in lactational performance and the development of appropriate feeding strategies. Two extreme types of sow were used in these experiments; lean pure-bred White sows (W: Large White and Landrace) and a prolific but fatter Meishan synthetic damline (M: 50% Meishan genes). M sows had higher numbers of piglets, a different feed intake curve and produced more milk with a higher fat content compared to W breed types. Their response to dietary protein was different for the two breeds; the Meishan sows, with higher initial levels of body fat reserves, used the extra protein to increase milk production. The White sows did not partition the extra protein into milk but used it to conserve their own maternal body reserves and improved their weaning to conception interval. The breed differences in sows performance were found not to be solely due to differences in litter size or piglet genotype or maternal body fat reserves. M sows showed better maternal behaviour with lower activity and shorter suckling intervals. It can be concluded from these experiments that Meishan synthetic sows are inherently better mothers, and the way in which sows of different breed types partition feed nutrients during lactation is very different. A dietary lysine concentration of 9 g/kg (giving daily intakes of 53-61 g/day at 98-111 MJ DE/day) optimised lactational and rebreeding performance in both breed types.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID:  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Animal husbandry & farm animals & pets Livestock Pets Biochemistry