Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.328554
Title: An historical analysis of police in Kuwait : prospects for the future.
Author: Al-Fahed, Mohammed.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3405 4574
Awarding Body: University of Exeter
Current Institution: University of Exeter
Date of Award: 1989
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Abstract:
The current status of the Kuwaiti police has been affected by the process of modernisation which occurred in Kuwait as the result of the discovery of oil. Rapid culturalisation occurred and a large influx of immigrants and non-Kuwaitis entered the country, leaving Kuwaiti with more than one half of its population being non-Kuwaiti. Although a large portion of these non-Kuwaitis have a tribal, Bedouin heritage and are predominantly Arab & Moslem, their loyalty to the Ruling family and ability to elevate their social status has become threatening to Kuwait's social and political structures. The police represent the only buffer between the varying factions in society and would normally be viewed as an impartial, unbiased force. However, what happened in Kuwait was rapid development caused by modernisation, led the police department to engage in unmonitored mass-hiring practices of individuals who belonged to other than native Kuwaiti social groupings. To compensate for the social tension voiced, the government implemented political policies to enfranchise these individuals, broadening the country's citizen-base. Instead of quelling concern, this intervention only heightened it because it magnified the disparities which existed in terms of what positions were available and to whom. To further exacerbate the problems, police practices in recruitment, hiring, promotion, salary, etc., were and still are applied using a dual system. The cumulative effect of thisThe current status of the Kuwaiti police has been affected by the process of modernisation which occurred in Kuwait as the result of the discovery of oil. Rapid culturalisation occurred and a large influx of immigrants and non-Kuwaitis entered the country, leaving Kuwaiti with more than one half of its population being non-Kuwaiti. Although a large portion of these non-Kuwaitis have a tribal, Bedouin heritage and are predominantly Arab & Moslem, their loyalty to the Ruling family and ability to elevate their social status has become threatening to Kuwait's social and political structures. The police represent the only buffer between the varying factions in society and would normally be viewed as an impartial, unbiased force. However, what happened in Kuwait was rapid development caused by modernisation, led the police department to engage in unmonitored mass-hiring practices of individuals who belonged to other than native Kuwaiti social groupings. To compensate for the social tension voiced, the government implemented political policies to enfranchise these individuals, broadening the country's citizen-base. Instead of quelling concern, this intervention only heightened it because it magnified the disparities which existed in terms of what positions were available and to whom. To further exacerbate the problems, police practices in recruitment, hiring, promotion, salary, etc., were and still are applied using a dual system. The cumulative effect of thissituation, over time, has only increased the criticism of the community about the police force terming police as incompetent and corrupt. Police, as a consequence, see themselves as ethnically segregated, disenfranchised and socially and politically limited in terms of advancement and opportunities. Native Kuwaitis who held the rank of officer in the police force have been affected to the degree they have been accused of misuse of authority, favouritism and abuse of those in lesser ranks, etc. Ultimately, this has generated mistrust and fear, hindering rather than enhancing the relationship between the varying levels and departments of the police organisation as well as jeopardising police-community relations which were already beginning to wane. This research effort was an attempt to identify some of the concerns as expressed by the police regarding their position in the police organisation and determine whether or not they perceived the policies governing recruitment, training, promotion, etc., as fair and equitable. This research used the demographic characteristics and attitudes of respondents as indicators to establish to what degree social, ethnic and cultural attributes influence their attitudes and ultimately influence police-public relations. The results suggest a number of changes which, if implemented, could contribute to an improved police organisation and enhanced public perceptions of the police and their relationship to the community
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.328554  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Sociology Sociology Human services
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