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Title: The electoral strategy and tactics of the British Liberal Party, 1945-1970.
Author: Joyce, Norman Peter.
Awarding Body: London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Current Institution: London School of Economics and Political Science (University of London)
Date of Award: 1989
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The options available to a minor political party concerning electoral strategy and tactics are usually greater than for a major political party. This thesis analyses the electoral objectives and the methods for their realisation put forward by the Liberal party in the period 1945 - 1970. The two strategies of the formation of a Liberal government and the realignment of the left are evaluated and the analysis is extended to include what is referred to as 'interim strategy'. The latter accepted that the party's strategy could not be accomplished as the consequence of the party's involvement in any one general election contest but needed to operate over a longer time scale. This suggested that the party required short term and long term electoral objectives arid the use made of interim strategy forms part of the examination of electoral strategy. The analysis of electoral tactics differentiates between 'primary tactics' and 'secondary tactics'. Primary tactics were the means presented to the electorate for the implementation of electoral strategy at a general election contest. Secondary tactics included a range of political activities carried out in the period between general election contests. Primary and secondary tactics are evaluated and in particular the extent to which electoral strategy and primary tactics were compatible with secondary tactics is analysed. The discussion of electoral strategy and tactics is not confined to ideas generated within the Liberal party but includes the views advanced by the Conservative arid Labour parties on the role of the Liberal party and Liberal supporters. The arguments presented in support of these views, and the Liberal party's response, forms part of the analysis of Liberal electoral strategy and tactics.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID:  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Political science Political science Public administration