Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.320831
Title: Early-warning signs in manic-depression : a prospective longitudinal study of four single cases.
Author: Collen, Alistair.
Awarding Body: University of East Anglia
Current Institution: University of East Anglia
Date of Award: 1996
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Abstract:
A prospective, longitudinal study was undertaken to examine the occurrence and form of prodromal symptoms in four individuals with bipolar affective disorder. Daily, selfreport ratings were made of mood, sleep, six early warning signs and the degree of concern which subjects felt about the current state of their mental health. Two subjects completed 6 months', and two subjects 3 months', worth of daily, weekly and fortnightly record keeping. Three subjects displayed persistent and marked day-to-day fluctuations in symptoms during periods of affective illness. One subject became hypomanic during the course of the study. His data suggested a model of early warning signs as covarying subclinical symptoms, the fluctuations of which increased in their amplitude as the mean level of their intensity rose. Where elements of this model could be tested on the data of the other three subjects, their results were found to be not inconsistent with this model. In view of the potential practical implications of these observations, for the use of early warning signs in self-management strategies, it was suggested that further research should be undertaken. This preliminary study had demonstrated the merit and feasibly of the method employed. However, it was anticipated that subjects who could be recruited for a future study might still not be representative of the wider bipolar population. In addition, some modifications to the present design were discussed.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: DClinPsych thesis Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.320831  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Medicine Medicine Psychology
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