Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.315102
Title: Fertilizer nitrogen transformations following urea application to an afforested ecosystem
Author: Hulm, Sharon C.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3584 1748
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1987
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Abstract:
Fertilizer nitrogen transformations in two Sitka spruce stands in northeast Scotland were studied using 15N-labelled (2.5 atom % 15N) urea at a rate equivalent to 160 kg N ha-1. The use of urea fertilizer resulted in accelerated growth of the tree crowns, and higher concentrations of total N in foliage, twigs and new wood. There was no fertilizer effect observed for bark. Despite a positive growth response by the trees to fertilizer N, only an estimated 17% of applied-N was utilized by the tree biomass. Application of urea-N resulted in a reduction in the leaching of inorganic N and certain cations (particularly Ca 2+). Gaseous losses of N were elevated following urea application, but estimated losses of fertilizer N via NH3 volatilization and denitrification were negligible. Data from both sites indicated a retention of volatilized NH3 in the tree canopy which was returned to the soil in throughfall. Urea application to the forest floor resulted in elevated pH of the LFH for a period of about 100 days. Urea application also led to a flush of acetic acid extractable PO4-P in the LFH. The addition of urea also resulted in increased counts of bacteria in the LFH. Data indicacted that elevated NO3- concentrations in the LFH may have been due to bacterial nitrification. Little effect of fertilizer N was observed for mineral soil, with a retention of the bulk of fertilizer N in the LFH.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.315102  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Soil Science & pedology Soil science Biochemistry Forests and forestry
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