Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.311397
Title: Predictors of objective and subjective career success
Author: Nabi, Ghulam Rasul
Awarding Body: University of Central Lancashire
Current Institution: University of Central Lancashire
Date of Award: 1999
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Abstract:
The main aim of this research was to examine predictors of both objective (salary). and subjective (perceived) career success. Three sets of predictors were examined: (1) individual attributes, (2) organisational opportunity structures and (3) career strategies. It was expected that a different pattern of variables would predict objective and subjective career success. In addition, the mediating role of career strategies was examined. It was expected that individual attributes and opportunity structures would be positively related to the use of career strategies, and that these strategies would be positively related to career success. Cross-sectional survey methodology was employed to collect data from a sample of 723 full-time employees in administrative/ technical, academic and managerial posts at several British universities. According to expectations, a different pattern of variables was related to objective and subjective career success. The strongest predictors of objective career success were education, organisational size and extended work involvement. In contrast, the strongest predictors of subjective career success were internal labour market perceptions of structured career progression and employment security. Separate analyses by gender and occupational group revealed a similar difference in the profile of predictors of objective and subjective career success. Overall, the results suggested that the variables that related to objective career success were often not the same as those related to subjective career success. This was taken as support for the main theme of this research that objective and subjective career success, although related, are substantially distinct concepts. Contrary to expectation, however, the results provided limited support for the mediating role of career strategies in the relationship between individual attributes, organisational opportunity structures and career success (objective and subjective). Only individual attributes (education and work centrality) were positively related to the use of career strategies (extended work involvement, selfpromotion and networking), and these strategies in turn were positively related to objective or subjective career success. However, the mediating role of career strategies was weak, albeit statistically significant. A number of limitations, mainly regarding the cross-sectional nature of the study, are discussed. Educational and organisational implications of the findings are suggested. Finally, a two-dimensional model of career success is proposed, incorporating the findings of the present research with reference to the predictors of objective and subjective career success, together with suggestions for further research.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.311397  DOI: Not available
Keywords: C800 - Psychology
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