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Title: Studies on survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6750
Author: Baretto, Bernadette J.
ISNI:       0000 0001 3444 7052
Awarding Body: Aston University
Current Institution: Aston University
Date of Award: 1996
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The growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6750 as a biofilm was investigated using a novel system based on that of Gilbert et al (1989). The aim was to test the effect of controlled growth of the organism on antibiotic susceptibility and examine the survival of the organism as a biofilm. During the investigations it became clear that, because of the increasing growth of P.aeruginosa and production of exopolysaccharide, a growth rate controlled monolayer could not be achieved and so the method was not used further. The data, however, showed that there was an increase in the smooth colony type of the organism during growth. Investigations were focused on the survival of P.aeruginosa in batch and chemostat studies. Survival or percentage culturability, as measured by total and colony count ratio, was found to decrease both in extended batch culture and for chemostat cells with decreasing growth rate. Extended batch culture, however, did not exhibit further increases in resistance to ciprofloxacin and polymyxin B. Survival was also measured using other parameters namely the direct viable count, vital staining, effect of temperature downshift and measurement of lag. In batch culture, the most notable change was a decrease in cell size along the growth curve. This was accompanied by an increase in the cellular protein content. Protein per volume was calculated from the data which showed a marked increase in batch culture, which was not demonstrated for chemostat cells with decreasing growth rate. Outer membrane protein profiles were obtained for batch and chemostat cells. An LPS profile of batch culture cells was also demonstrated. In general, there was little difference in the outer membrane protein profiles of cells from early and late stationary phases.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Phd
EThOS ID:  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Pharmacy ; Biological Sciences Microbiology