Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.306763
Title: The multiresolution Fourier transform and its application to polyphonic audio analysis
Author: Pearson, Edward R. S.
Awarding Body: University of Warwick
Current Institution: University of Warwick
Date of Award: 1991
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Abstract:
Many people listen to, or at least hear, some form of music almost every day of their lives. However, only some of the processes involved in creating the sensations and emotions evoked by the music are understood in any detail. The problem of unravelling these processes has been much less thoroughly investigated than the comparable topics of speech and image recognition; this has almost certainly been caused by the existence of a greater number of applications awaiting this knowledge. Nevertheless, the area of music perception has attracted some attention over the last few decades and there is an increasing interest in the subject largely arising from the availability of suitably powerful technology. It is becoming feasible to use such technology to construct artificial hearing devices which attempt to reproduce the functionality of the human auditory system. The construction of such devices is both a powerful method of verifying operational theories of the human auditory system and may ultimately provide a means of analysing music in more detail than man. In addition to the analytical benefits, techniques developed in this manner are readily applicable to the creative aspects of music, such as the composition of new music and musical sounds.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Science and Engineering Research Council (Great Britain) (SERC) ; Solid State Logic Ltd.
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.306763  DOI: Not available
Keywords: ML Literature of music ; QA76 Electronic computers. Computer science. Computer software Sound Pattern recognition systems Pattern perception Image processing Video recording Sound Recording and reproducing
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