Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.293582
Title: The household and resources of the Lord Edward, 1239-1272
Author: Wait, Hilary Anne
ISNI:       0000 0001 3550 5939
Awarding Body: University of Oxford
Current Institution: University of Oxford
Date of Award: 1988
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Abstract:
The first part of the thesis examines the resources available to the Lord Edward during the life-time of Henry III, their scope and limitations , and the opportunities they afforded him. It addresses itself particularly to the availability and value of the disparate resources as a means of maintaining his affinity, and to the question of tension between Edward and his father over management and exploitation. The various elements of the resources are examined, with the changes which tilted the balance away from the less flexible returns of the landed estates to those giving greater liquidity. Edward's preference for the latter and his wide-ranging use of credit form a precedent for the financial expedients which characterise his reign. Also examined are the acquisitions which exemplified his military and political successes; the fruits of victory over the Montfortians, and the strategic commissions which culminated in the mass transfer of 1270, epitomising the dominant position Edward had achieved in the kingdom since 1265. The second part considers the structure of Edward's household departments, and their operation and interaction with his estate administration and wider activities. The backgrounds and associations of the members of the household are analysed, with a discussion of their contributions to Edward's operations. While this evidence throws light on aspects such as the alien element within the household, and the political alignments of Edward and his affinity, a full analysis of the ideological ferment and political vicissitudes has not been attempted. Instead the study of Edward's material and human resources is intended to provide a firmer basis for the general interpretation of the period.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.293582  DOI: Not available
Keywords: History
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