Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.292544
Title: The investigation of vegetation change using remote sensing to detect and monitor migration of landfill gas
Author: Jones, Helen K.
Awarding Body: Aston University
Current Institution: Aston University
Date of Award: 1991
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Abstract:
Decomposition of domestic wastes in an anaerobic environment results in the production of landfill gas. Public concern about landfill disposal and particularly the production of landfill gas has been heightened over the past decade. This has been due in large to the increased quantities of gas being generated as a result of modern disposal techniques, and also to their increasing effect on modern urban developments. In order to avert diasters, effective means of preventing gas migration are required. This, in turn requires accurate detection and monitoring of gas in the subsurface. Point sampling techniques have many drawbacks, and accurate measurement of gas is difficult. Some of the disadvantages of these techniques could be overcome by assessing the impact of gas on biological systems. This research explores the effects of landfill gas on plants, and hence on the spectral response of vegetation canopies. Examination of the landfill gas/vegetation relationship is covered, both by review of the literature and statistical analysis of field data. The work showed that, although vegetation health was related to landfill gas, it was not possible to define a simple correlation. In the landfill environment, contribution from other variables, such as soil characteristics, frequently confused the relationship. Two sites are investigated in detail, the sites contrasting in terms of the data available, site conditions, and the degree of damage to vegetation. Gas migration at the Panshanger site was dominantly upwards, affecting crops being grown on the landfill cap. The injury was expressed as an overall decline in plant health. Discriminant analysis was used to account for the variations in plant health, and hence the differences in spectral response of the crop canopy, using a combination of soil and gas variables. Damage to both woodland and crops at the Ware site was severe, and could be easily related to the presence of gas. Air photographs, aerial video, and airborne thematic mapper data were used to identify damage to vegetation, and relate this to soil type. The utility of different sensors for this type of application is assessed, and possible improvements that could lead to more widespread use are identified. The situations in which remote sensing data could be combined with ground survey are identified. In addition, a possible methodology for integrating the two approaches is suggested.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Phd
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.292544  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Civil Engineering Refuse and refuse disposal Refuse and refuse disposal Pattern recognition systems Pattern perception Image processing
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